Tuesday, March 27, 2018

Review of Lovecraft Country by Matt Ruff

The critically acclaimed cult novelist makes visceral the terrors of life in Jim Crow America and its lingering effects in this brilliant and wondrous work of the imagination that melds historical fiction, pulp noir, and Lovecraftian horror and fantasy.

Chicago, 1954. When his father Montrose goes missing, twenty-two year old Army veteran Atticus Turner embarks on a road trip to New England to find him, accompanied by his Uncle George—publisher of The Safe Negro Travel Guide—and his childhood friend Letitia. On their journey to the manor of Mr. Braithwhite—heir to the estate that owned Atticus’s great grandmother—they encounter both mundane terrors of white America and malevolent spirits that seem straight out of the weird tales George devours.

At the manor, Atticus discovers his father in chains, held prisoner by a secret cabal named the Order of the Ancient Dawn—led by Samuel Braithwhite and his son Caleb—which has gathered to orchestrate a ritual that shockingly centers on Atticus. And his one hope of salvation may be the seed of his—and the whole Turner clan’s—destruction.

A chimerical blend of magic, power, hope, and freedom that stretches across time, touching diverse members of one black family, Lovecraft Country is a devastating kaleidoscopic portrait of racism—the terrifying specter that continues to haunt us today.



I loved this book! I loved it for all of its complexities that cause the reader to think about things on different levels. One theme that stood out to me was the fact that Caleb Braithwhite, the villain in the story, is like the only nice white man in the story, but the thing of it is, he's not a nice man. Atticus and the rest of his friends are great characters to follow. They are complex and human and make the story come alive.

I think this would be a great book for anyone to put on their reading list. It's very well written, connects the stories nicely, and is a perfect example of how to create meaningful characters. Any aspiring author could learn a thing or two from reading this exceptional book!

Amazon   /    Goodreads 


Monday, March 19, 2018

Review of Perilous by Mary-Jean Harris with GIVEAWAY!!


Long ago, during Archangel Lucifer’s attempt to usurp Heaven, he sequestered the angelic part of his spirit into a jewel. This spirit, after falling to Earth and becoming trapped in a chalice, later becomes known as the Sangreal, or the Holy Grail. Throughout its time on Earth, the Sangreal observes humanity and waits for an enlightened human to return it to Heaven. However, after a millennium passes, Lucifer decides to regain the Sangreal to make another attempt to conquer Heaven. In Britain in the Middle Ages, Lucifer conceives a son with a human woman who he plans to sway to retrieve the Sangreal. The boy is named Merlin. Michael too conceives a child with a human, a daughter named Nimue who he hopes will befriend Merlin and turn him away from evil. Although their powers and motivations are quite different, the lives of Merlin and Nimue converge with the Sangreal, initiating a legendary age with these half-Archangels working magic in the shadows. Yet Lucifer, as well those under his influence, threaten the Sangreal’s attempts to return to Heaven, along with imperiling the lives of countless others ensnared in his plots.

Amazon    Goodreads


* I was given a copy of the book in exchange for my honest review* 

I thoroughly enjoyed this novel! I loved that it was written from the perspective of the Holy Grail. This aspect alone makes this novel a delightful read! Mary-Jean does a great job weaving traditional religious stories to the lore of Arthur and Merlin. This mix of storylines combines well and makes total sense in the story. Another thing I loved about this story is that it has some surprises I wasn't expecting, which is always a plus in my book! 

You don't need to be religious to enjoy this story. If you enjoy stories that are a little different and cause you to think then this would be a story for you. Since it is just a novella it makes for a quick, enjoyable read. 




Mary-Jean Harris is a Canadian author of young adult fantasy novels and short stories. She is writing the historical fantasy series The Soul Wanderers, the first book of which is Aizai the Forgotten. Mary-Jean also studies theoretical physics and has her Masters degree from the Perimeter Institute in Waterloo. She loves to travel and explore old castles and ruins.

Website 

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Wednesday, March 14, 2018

Cover Reveal for Serpents and Saviors by Jamie Zakain plus WIN A $15 GIFT CARD!






Hello Readers! Welcome to the Cover Reveal for
Serpents and Saviors (Project Emergence #2)
by Jamie Zakian
presented by Month9Books!
Celebrate this reveal by entering the giveaway found at the end of the post!




Lord of the Rings Meets The 100

Joey got separated from her twin brother Jesse when their luxury spacecraft broke apart halfway to Mars. The terrorists are dead, but so are most of the passengers who escaped a dying Earth for a new life on a new planet.

The remaining survivors, the future of humanity, are scattered across the lush planet of Mars. Joey and Kami are in a mountainous forest, and they’re locked in a power struggle to guide the people. Jesse and Rai landed on the coast, and are desperate to reach their sisters.

This new world can be a fresh start, where everyone is equal and class sectors are finally made obsolete, if only Kami would give up her self-appointed position as Commander of Mars. Both Joey and Kami are willing to die for their beliefs, even sacrificing the lives of those who’ve chosen to follow them, unless cleared heads can prevail before it’s too late.
Serpents and Saviors (Project Emergence #2)
by Jamie Zakian
Release Date: April 10, 2018
Publisher: Month9Books
Available for Pre-order:




Jamie Zakian is a full-time writer who consumes the written word as equally as oxygen. Living in South Jersey with her husband and rowdy family, she enjoys farming, archery, and blazing new trails on her 4wd quad, when not writing of course. She aspires to one day write at least one novel in every genre of fiction.



Complete the Rafflecopter below for a chance to win!

Tuesday, March 13, 2018

Interview with Kate Murdoch author of Stone Circle

One thing I find when learning a new craft or polishing up on my writing skills, is talking to other writers about their journey. Kate was gracious enough to answer some questions that I think any aspiring author could benefit from! Don't forget to check out her book Stone Circle as well! 


Interview with Author Kate Murdoch 


What was that first idea that made you decide to put pen to paper?


Before I wrote Stone Circle, I wrote a supernatural thriller. Along with a character much like myself, it contained a homicidal misfit who I’d dreamt of and was inspired to write about. The book was just a practice run, but the process of redrafting it taught me a lot about the basics of structure and plot. 

Have you always wanted to write historical fantasy fiction? What draws you to it?


Not always. It found me, because my second idea for a novel also came to me in a dream, and I knew the period was long ago. So I pinpointed the Renaissance as the ideal time to set the book. There are many aspects of writing historical fiction that I love. The research takes me in many directions and gives me a sense of place and time. I enjoy immersing myself in different worlds with each book. It’s easier to do this with historical fiction, both as a reader and a writer, because everything is so removed and different from the present. At the same time, I learn about the challenges and way of life in different periods and cultures. In terms of writing fantasy, it seemed necessary for this particular book because I was writing about alchemy. 

How did you come up with the story idea of Stone Circle?


As I mentioned, I had a dream. In the dream, an old man rowed two young men on a tranquil stretch of water. He was imparting knowledge. That was all I had to go from, but research helped me flesh out the idea.

Was one character in Stone Circle more fun to write than another?


I loved writing my villain, Nichola. He’s spoilt, arrogant and entitled but has a tender side he’s never explored. To give him the balance of vulnerability along with harshness was a challenge, and I enjoyed playing with these two opposing sides of his personality.

What's one of the best resources you know of for new writers?


I would recommend joining writers’ Facebook groups, for whatever stage they are at. For me they’ve been indispensable when I needed an answer to a technical question, to vent, or to just take in others’ ideas and knowledge. As a general resource on writing https://writersedit.com/ has some interesting articles. 

What's your favorite part of the writing process?


The research because it feeds my imagination. Also when I’m full flow into a story and it comes to me as if it's channeled from somewhere else.

What other projects/books can readers look forward to from you?


I have written another novel, The Orange Grove, which will be released by Regal House Publishing in 2019. It’s a story about morality, obsession, madness and intrigue, set in an 18th century French chateau. I’m really looking forward to sharing it with readers. 



About Stone Circle


Is the ability to read minds a blessing or a curse?

When Antonius’s father dies, he must work to support his family. He finds employment as a servant in the Palazzo Ducal, home of Conte Valperga. Sixteenth-century Pesaro is a society governed by status, and Antonius has limited opportunities.

When a competition is announced, Antonius seizes his chance. The winner will be apprenticed to the town seer. Antonius shares first place with his employer’s son.

The two men compete for their mentor’s approval. As their knowledge of magic and alchemy grows, so does the rivalry and animosity between them. When the love of a beautiful woman is at stake, Antonius must find a way to follow his heart and navigate his future. 



Amazon  /  Goodreads